A woman in the Sudetenland greets incoming German troops with tears and a Nazi salute, 1938The Sudetenland (Czech and Slovak: Sudety, Polish: Kraj Sudetów) is the German name (used in English in the first half of the 20th century) to refer to those northern, southwest, and western areas of Czechoslovakia which were inhabited mostly by German speakers, specifically the border districts of Bohemia, Moravia, and those parts of Silesia located within Czechoslovakia. A proposed 1938 referendum to show what proportion of the Sudetenland’s residents would claim a German ethnic background did not take place, following Adolf Hitler’s demands at the Munich Agreement.

A woman in the Sudetenland greets incoming German troops with tears and a Nazi salute, 1938
The Sudetenland (Czech and Slovak: Sudety, Polish: Kraj Sudetów) is the German name (used in English in the first half of the 20th century) to refer to those northern, southwest, and western areas of Czechoslovakia which were inhabited mostly by German speakers, specifically the border districts of Bohemia, Moravia, and those parts of Silesia located within Czechoslovakia. A proposed 1938 referendum to show what proportion of the Sudetenland’s residents would claim a German ethnic background did not take place, following Adolf Hitler’s demands at the Munich Agreement.