A Long-nosed god maskette excavated from the Yokem Mound Group in Pike County, IllinoisLong-nosed god maskettes are artifacts made from bone, copper and marine shells (Busycon) associated with the Mississippian culture (800 to 1600 CE) and found in archaeological sites in the American Midwest and Southeast. They are small shield-shaped faces with squared-off foreheads, circular eyes, and large noses of various lengths. They are often shown on Southeastern Ceremonial Complex representations of falcon impersonators as ear ornaments. Long and short nosed versions of the masks have been found in ten different states, with the majority found at sites in Illinois. Many archaeologists now associate them with the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) stories of the mythological being Red Horn.

A Long-nosed god maskette excavated from the Yokem Mound Group in Pike County, Illinois
Long-nosed god maskettes are artifacts made from bone, copper and marine shells (Busycon) associated with the Mississippian culture (800 to 1600 CE) and found in archaeological sites in the American Midwest and Southeast. They are small shield-shaped faces with squared-off foreheads, circular eyes, and large noses of various lengths. They are often shown on Southeastern Ceremonial Complex representations of falcon impersonators as ear ornaments. Long and short nosed versions of the masks have been found in ten different states, with the majority found at sites in Illinois. Many archaeologists now associate them with the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) stories of the mythological being Red Horn.