The Falls of Halladale, aground near Peterborough, Victoria, Australia. 1886The Falls of Halladale was a four-masted iron-hulled barque that was built in 1886 for the long-distance bulk carrier trade. Her dimensions were 83.87m x 12.64m x 7.23m and she displaced 2085 GRT and 2026 NRT. Built for the Falls Line (Wright, Breakenridge & Co., Glasgow, Scotland) at the shipyard of Russell & Co., Greenock on the River Clyde, she was named after a rather small waterfall on the Halladale River in the Caithness district of Scotland. The ship’s design was advanced for her time, incorporating features that improved crew safety and efficiency such as elevated bridges to allow the crew to move between forward and aft in relative safety during heavy seas.

The Falls of Halladale, aground near Peterborough, Victoria, Australia. 1886
The Falls of Halladale was a four-masted iron-hulled barque that was built in 1886 for the long-distance bulk carrier trade. Her dimensions were 83.87m x 12.64m x 7.23m and she displaced 2085 GRT and 2026 NRT. Built for the Falls Line (Wright, Breakenridge & Co., Glasgow, Scotland) at the shipyard of Russell & Co., Greenock on the River Clyde, she was named after a rather small waterfall on the Halladale River in the Caithness district of Scotland. The ship’s design was advanced for her time, incorporating features that improved crew safety and efficiency such as elevated bridges to allow the crew to move between forward and aft in relative safety during heavy seas.